the Dinosaur Project

plasticcritters:

paleobiology:

salamandersalsa:

assuming-dinosaur:

paleobiology:

northenn:

paleobiology:

prehistoric-starships:

paleobiology:

"Realistic dinosaurs"

Looking at this is painful.

I like the dark green kaiju thing in the middle left. Like I don’t even know what that’s supposed to be

Maybe if I wish really hard that green winged thing on the bottom right will eventually fall on me and put an end to this pain.

I think only like four of those can even qualify as dinosaurs.

I am firmly convinced that the bottom left is a hybrid of Macrauchenia and Dimetrodon.
Also, bulette! Shame there isn’t an owl bear or rust monster to go with it…

i want these

Bringin this beauty back

Very impressive Paleo-toy-fail. 
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plasticcritters:

paleobiology:

salamandersalsa:

assuming-dinosaur:

paleobiology:

northenn:

paleobiology:

prehistoric-starships:

paleobiology:

"Realistic dinosaurs"

Looking at this is painful.

I like the dark green kaiju thing in the middle left. Like I don’t even know what that’s supposed to be

Maybe if I wish really hard that green winged thing on the bottom right will eventually fall on me and put an end to this pain.

I think only like four of those can even qualify as dinosaurs.

I am firmly convinced that the bottom left is a hybrid of Macrauchenia and Dimetrodon.

Also, bulette! Shame there isn’t an owl bear or rust monster to go with it…

i want these

Bringin this beauty back

Very impressive Paleo-toy-fail. 


antediluvianechoes:

Mother Earth-Mother Dinosaur, Ruth Showalter, 2007, for the book El Dinosaurio que Excavo su Madriguera
Crafted meticulously, cleaned routinely, the burrow cradled the family, kept them close. They wrapped themselves around each other, pressed themselves against the earth as a child does with a favorite blanket, or new life does against the walls of a womb: with security and familiarity. Beyond the main chamber, a bending tunnel led to the outside. It curled along the way into tiny places where bees hived and mammals hid. They, too, wanted that quiet certainty with its darkness and heavy odors.
The floods came; the dinosaurs drowned. Sand smothered their jumbled bones. Tragedy preserved the burrow. Womb became tomb. But it’s not this irony that makes you pause, it’s that a home preserves. It keeps bodies from chill and rain, heat and hail. It provides seclusion and privacy, but can be opened to share. It makes a place where ownership can be expressed with a cloud painting by your father hung in the hall; and a Persian rug, its reds and golds and midnight blues woven into geometric blossoms; and the notes pinned above the desk, slips of paper to remind you that she calls you zlato and srdce and láska moja; and the shoes strewn near the door; andthe books shelved with memories between the words, moments burned into the paper to be re-felt when your eyes rove the spines or your fingers run along the edges of pages. Home is safety for body and mind and all that’s valuable and ephemeral. And here, you note, saved in stone, lie 95 million-year-old intimacies.
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antediluvianechoes:

Mother Earth-Mother Dinosaur, Ruth Showalter, 2007, for the book El Dinosaurio que Excavo su Madriguera

Crafted meticulously, cleaned routinely, the burrow cradled the family, kept them close. They wrapped themselves around each other, pressed themselves against the earth as a child does with a favorite blanket, or new life does against the walls of a womb: with security and familiarity. Beyond the main chamber, a bending tunnel led to the outside. It curled along the way into tiny places where bees hived and mammals hid. They, too, wanted that quiet certainty with its darkness and heavy odors.

The floods came; the dinosaurs drowned. Sand smothered their jumbled bones. Tragedy preserved the burrow. Womb became tomb. But it’s not this irony that makes you pause, it’s that a home preserves. It keeps bodies from chill and rain, heat and hail. It provides seclusion and privacy, but can be opened to share. It makes a place where ownership can be expressed with a cloud painting by your father hung in the hall; and a Persian rug, its reds and golds and midnight blues woven into geometric blossoms; and the notes pinned above the desk, slips of paper to remind you that she calls you zlato and srdce and láska moja; and the shoes strewn near the door; andthe books shelved with memories between the words, moments burned into the paper to be re-felt when your eyes rove the spines or your fingers run along the edges of pages. Home is safety for body and mind and all that’s valuable and ephemeral. And here, you note, saved in stone, lie 95 million-year-old intimacies.


mypubliclands:

Bistahieversor - aka the ‘Bisti Beast’ – Goes to Washington

The BLM New Mexico’s regional paleontologist recently packed a Penske truck and took off for Washington D.C. The truck was filled with the most complete specimen of large carnivorous dinosaur ever found in the state of New Mexico — and it was found on BLM-administered land in the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness Area.

The Bistahieversor—affectionately known as the Bisti Beast—was a 30-foot tyrannosaur that roamed the Earth around 74 million years ago. It was a member of the same family as Tyrannosaurus rex, looked like a compact version of T.rex, and might have been one of its ancestors. This was an extremely rare find and is of exceptionally high scientific value. It is estimated that 40 to 60 percent of the skeleton was preserved.

The 41,170-acre wilderness area is a rolling landscape of badlands which offers some of the most unusual scenery found in the Four Corners Region. The wilderness area is composed of formations of interbedded sandstone, shale, mudstone, coal, and silt. Paleontologists have studied and researched this area for nearly a century. The Badlands feature an exposure of rocks known as the Fruitland/Kirtland Formations that represent a time near the end of the Cretaceous Period (approximately 75 to 80 million years ago). These continental sediments chronicle the time near the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. This sequence of rock formations is one of only four known in the world that record this transition and may help explain why the dinosaurs became extinct.

In 1998, the specimen was removed in two pieces after being encased in a protective plaster “jacket,” each weighing nearly a ton. Because the skeleton was located in a wilderness area, it was removed by Army National Guard helicopter and deposited on a large flatbed trailer for transport to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, in Albuquerque, N.M., where is has been housed ever since.

BLM and New Mexico Museum of Natural History staff packed the specimen for the three-day road trip to Washington, D.C., where it will be on display at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History.